Data Sharehouse?

This is yet another new term in our lexicon. The San Mateo, California-based startup Snowflake announced this week a new offering with this name, as a free add-on to the data warehouse it built for cloud computing. Now companies using Snowflake’s technology, officially called Snowflake Data Sharing, can share any part of their data warehouses, subject to defined security policies and controls on access, with each other.

Snowflake’s data sharehouse allows companies to provide direct access to structured and unstructured data without the need to copy the data to a new location. Current approaches include file-sharing, electronic data interchange, application programming interfaces and email, but all of them have issues ranging from lack of security to cumbersome methods of providing data access to the right people. Jon Bock, Snowflake’s marketing chief compared the difference in data sharing on Snowflake versus other methods to the difference between streaming music and compact discs. “It looks [to the data recipient] just as if the data resides on their own data warehouse,” he said.

The catch is that every participant must be a Snowflake customer using their data warehouse in the cloud. So this is another way to grow their market. We have seen this approach in the 1990s when Exchanges were introduced by the likes of Oracle for B2B data interchange. That did not go very far. Of course cost was a big factor, but the policy agreement on common formats and security for data exchange was another issue. Snowflake claims to solve this by having one source of truth in the cloud.

Of course companies, like manufacturers and suppliers, advertisers and publishers have been sharing data for quite a long time, but it has been cumbersome via technologies like EDI (electronic data interchange, developed in the 1940s), email, file sharing, APIs and more. That kind of sharing takes time and wasn’t created for the current situation, in which businesses need live data processed in real time to keep a competitive edge.

According to Bob Muglia, Snowflake’s CEO (ex-Microsoft), the data sharehouse changes the game and democratizes the possibilities, because anyone can access the service. Rather than being charged a subscription fee, users pay only according to the amount of data they have processed. Snowflake’s data sharing service is free to data providers, data consumers pay for the compute resources they use. Not only that, but data providers and consumers make their arrangements independent of Snowflake Computing which is the infrastructure provider.

In an increasingly collaborative world there is little doubt that sharing data easily, and in real time, without sacrificing security, privacy, governance and compliance is of great value. Whether it will create entirely new markets has yet to be seen, but actionable data-driven insights are likely to be huge differentiators in the digital economy.

It is a clever move, but time will tell if this will enable smooth data exchange or create more chaos.

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