Linux & Cloud Computing

While reading the latest issue of the Economist, I was reminded that August 25th. marks an important anniversary for two key events:  25 years back, on August 25, 1991, Linus Torvalds launched a new operating system called Linux and on the same day in 2006, Amazon under the leadership of Andy Jesse launched the beta version of Elastic Computing Cloud (EC2), the central piece of Amazon Web Services (AWS).

The two are very interlinked. Linux became the world’s most used piece of software of its type. Of course Linux usage soared due to backers like HP, Oracle, and IBM to combat the Windows force. Without open-source programs like Linux, cloud computing would not have happened. Currently 1500 developers contribute to each new version of Linux. AWS servers deploy Linux heavily. Being first to succeed on a large scale allowed both Linux and AWS to take advantage of the network effect, which makes popular products even more entrenched.

Here are some facts about AWS. It’s launch back in 2006 was extremely timely, just one year before the smartphones came about. Apple launched its iPhone in 2007 which ushered the app economy. AWS became the haven for start-ups making up nearly two-third of its customer base (estimated at 1 million). According to Gartner Group, the cloud computing market is at $205B in 2016, which is 6% of the world’s IT budget of $3.4 trillion. This number will grow to $240B next year. No wonder, Amazon is reaping the benefits – over past 12 months, AWS revenue reached $11B with a margin of over 50%. During the last quarter, AWS sales were 3 times more than the nearest competitor, Microsoft Azure. AWS has ten times more computing capacity than the next 14 cloud providers combined. We also saw the fate of Rackspace last week (acquired by a private equity firm). Other cloud computing providers like Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, and IBM (acquired SoftLayer in 2013) are struggling to keep up with AWS.

The latest battleground in cloud computing is data. AWS offers Aurora and Redshift in that space. It also started a new services called Snowball, a suitcase-sized box of digital memory which can store mountains of data in the AWS cloud (interesting challenge to Box and Dropbox). IBM bought Truven Health Analytics which keeps data on 215m patients in the healthcare industry.

The Economist article said, “AWS could end up dominating the IT industry just as IBM’s System/360, a family of mainframe computers did until the 1980s.”       I hope it’s not so and we need serious competition to AWS for customer’s benefits. Who wants a single-vendor “lock-in”? Microsoft’s Azure seems to be moving fast. Let us hope IBM, Google, and Oracle move very aggressively offering equivalent or better alternatives to Amazon cloud services.

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One response to “Linux & Cloud Computing

  1. Kudos to Amazon for building such a strong product as early as 2006!

    In addition, AWS announced a metric that was hard to contend with: over 1 million active enterprise users, not individuals.

    AWS placed its data centers across 33 availability zones within 12 regions worldwide. Each availability zone has at least one data center (some have as many as six) that has redundant power for stability, networking and connectivity. In each data center, there are between 50,000 to 80,000 servers with up to 102 Tbps bandwidth.

    If you assume an average of three data centers per zone and 65,000 servers per data center, you will end up having 6.4 million servers worldwide. For those of you who care about availability and performance of their applications in the cloud, the huge computing capacity of AWS ensures higher fault tolerance and low latency. Microsoft and Google or way behind in this race.

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