IBM’s Software Business

IBM has come a long way from my time – 16 years spent during the 1970s, 1980’s and early 1990s. Hardware was the king for most of my years there and software was merely a means to an end of “hardware sales”. Even during the early years of the IBM PC, that mistake (of thinking it was a hardware game), helped create a new software giant called Microsoft. Hence the acronym IBM was jokingly called I Blame Microsoft.

Advance two decades and we see a big shift of focus from hardware to software, finally. IBM has sold off much of its non-mainframe hardware (x86 servers) & storage business. During the 4th. quarter of 2015, IBM’s share of server-market was 14.1% with an impressive yearly growth of 8.9%. Contrast this to the growth rates of HPE(-2.1%), Dell (5.3%), and Lenovo (3.7%).

IBM’s software is another story. While it contributed about 28% to total revenue in 2015 ($81.7B), the profit contribution was 60%. If it’s software was a separate business, it would rank as the fourth largest software company, as shown below:

  1. Microsoft  –  $93.6B Rev. —> 30.1% profit
  2. Oracle        – $38.2B Rev. —> 36.8% profit
  3. SAP            –  $23.2B Rev. —> 23.4% profit
  4. IBM           –  $22.9B Rev.  —> 34.6% profit

IBM’s software is second most profitable after Oracle’s. The $22.9B revenue can be split into three components:

  • Middleware at 19.5B (includes everything above the operating system like DB2, CICS, Tivoli, Bluemix, etc.),
  • Operating System at $1.8B,
  • Miscellaneous at $1.6B.

It does not split its cloud software explicitly. Therefore, it is hard to compare it to AWS or Azure or GCE.

The only problem is that its software business is not growing. As a matter of fact, it showed a decline last year. Given the rise of cloud services, IBM has to step up its competitive offering in that space. It did acquire Softlayer couple of years back at a hefty price, but the cloud infrastructure growth does not match that of AWS (expected to hit $10B this year).

IBM is a company in transition. Resources are being shifted toward high-growth areas like cloud computing and analytics, and legacy businesses with poor growth prospects are in decline. Still, IBM remains a major force in the software market.

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