Big Data Visualization

Recently I listened to a discussion on Big Data Visualization hosted by Bill McKnight of the McKnight Consulting group. The panelists agreed that Big Data is shifting from the hype state to an “imperative” state. For start-up companies, there are more Big Data projects whereas true big data is still a small part of the enterprise practice. At many companies, Big Data is moving from POC (Proof of Concept) to production. Interest in visualization of data from different sources is certainly increasing. There is a growth in data-driven decision-making as evidenced by the increasing use of platforms like YARN, HIVE, and Spark. The traditional approach of RDBMS platform can not scale to meet the needs of rapidly growing volume and varieties of Big Data.

So what is the difference between Data Exploration vs. Data Visualization? Data exploration is more analytical and is used to test hypothesis, whereas visualization is used to profile data and is more structured. The suggestion is to bring visualization to the beginning of data cycle (not the end) to do better data exploration. For example, in a personalized cancer treatment, the finding and examining of output of white blood counts and cancer cells can be done upfront using data visualization. In Internet e-commerce, billions of rows of data can be analyzed to understand consumer behavior. One customer uses Hadoop and Tableau’s visualization software to do this. Tableau enables visualization of all kinds of data sources from three scenarios – cold data from a data lake on Hadoop (where source data in native format can be located); warm data from a smaller set of data; or hot data served in-memory for faster processing.

Data format can be a challenge. How do you do visualization of NoSQL data? For example, JSON data (supported by MongoDB) is nested and schema-less and is hard for BI tools. Understanding data is crucial and flattening of nested hierarchies will be needed. Nested arrays can be broken as foreign keys. Graph data is another special case, where visualization of the right amount of graphs data is critical (good UX).

Apache Drill is an open source, low latency SQL query engine for Hadoop and NoSQL. Modern big data applications such as social, mobile, web and IoT deal with a larger number of users and larger amount of data than the traditional transactional applications. The datasets associated with these applications evolve rapidly, are often self-describing and can include complex types such as JSON and Parquet. Apache Drill is built from the ground up to provide low latency queries natively on such rapidly evolving multi-structured datasets at scale.

Apache Spark is another exciting new approach to speed up queries by utilizing memory. It consists of Spark SQL (SQL like queries), Spark string, MLLib, and GraphX. It leverages Python, Scala, and Java to do the processing. It enables users of Hadoop to have more fun with data analysis and visualization.

Big Data Visualization is emerging to be a critical component for extracting business value from data.

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